Chemical Sciences

Program Competencies for LACH

Upon graduation from these programs, students shall have the ability to:

  • Formulate clear and precise questions about complex problems and ideas relevant to a variety of disciplines—math, science, the humanities, and the social sciences—and gather, assess, and interpret information to arrive at well-reasoned conclusions and solutions.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of complex written texts that demand an appreciation of subtext, irony, metaphor, and the subtlety and nuances of language.
  • Successfully complete a substantial research paper that demonstrates the ability to formulate a research question, conduct research using the library’s databases, and synthesize information from a variety of sources into a cohesive and in-depth analysis of a topic.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of historic, social, and cultural backgrounds necessary for understanding their own and other societies with an emphasis on important ideas and events that have shaped, and continue to shape, their world.
  • Demonstrate scientific literacy, which can be defined as the matrix of knowledge needed to understand enough about the universe to deal with issues that come across the horizon of the average citizen, in the news or elsewhere.
  • Demonstrate a broad exposure to, and an understanding of, the differences and similarities in the various academic disciplines within their Liberal Arts education.
  • Successfully transfer to a baccalaureate degree granting institution if desired, with the proper educational foundation for transition into a chosen field of study.
  • Demonstrate the ability to collect, record and organize scientific data correctly.
  • Demonstrate the ability to work safely in a laboratory environment.
  • Demonstrate the ability to manipulate and use scientific tools, such as the microscope, pH meter, measurement tools, glassware and other scientific instrumentation. This would include independently conducting an experiment using written directions such as lab manuals or Standard Operating Procedures as a guide.
  • Demonstrate the ability to use mathematical tools as applied to science. This could include building and interpreting graphs, using equations and formulas to solve problems, and fitting data to a mathematical model.
  • Demonstrate the ability to search scientific literature and use the information.

Technical Standards for LACH

Students entering these programs must be able to demonstrate the ability to:

  • Comprehend textbook material at a college level.
  • Communicate and assimilate information either in spoken, printed, signed, or computer voice format.
  • Gather, analyze, and draw conclusions from data.
  • Stand for a minimum of two hours.
  • Differentiate by touch: hotness/coldness, wetness/dryness, and hardness/softness.
  • Use the small muscle dexterity necessary to do such tasks as gloving, gowning, and operating controls on laboratory instrumentation.
  • Respond promptly to spoken words, monitor signals, and instrument alarms.
  • Identify behaviors that would endanger a person’s life or safety and intervene quickly in a crisis situation with an appropriate solution.
  • Remain calm, rational, decisive, and in control at all times, especially during emergency situations.
  • Manipulate small parts, and make fine hand adjustments to machines and test equipment.
  • Operate a computer.

New: Chemical Sciences (LACH)

This program is designed to prepare students to transfer in chemistry with an A.A. degree and Mass Transfer benefits.  It will give the students the first two years of a typical chemistry program so that they can transfer as juniors.  Since many of these classes are two semester sequential courses it is recommended that students start this program in the fall.

Year 1
FallCredits
CHE 107General Chemistry I 4
ENG 101English Composition I 3
MAT 163Pre-Calculus 4
Behavioral Social Science 1 3
Culturally Diverse Humanities Elective (See list below)  3
Spring
CHE 108General Chemistry II 4
ENG 102English Composition II 3
MAT 211Calculus I 4
SPC 113Speech (formerly THE113) 3
Non Behavioral Social Science Elective 2 3
Year 2
Fall
CHE 207Organic Chemistry I 4
MAT 212Calculus II 4
PHY 120Physics for Engineering and Science I 4
Culturally Diverse Literature Elective (see list below)  3
PER 126 or 130Fitness And Wellness 32-3
Spring
CHE 208Organic Chemistry II 4
PHY 121Physics for Engineering and Science II 4
Social Science Elective 4 3
ISC 210Critical Thinking 3
 Total Credits: 65-66
1

Behavioral Social Sciences: ANT, PSY, SOC, SSC

2

 Non-Behavioral Social Sciences: ECO, GEO, HIS, POL, SSC

3

 Some colleges require a 3 Physical Education elective. Please consult your adviser.

4

 Social Sciences-ANT, ECO, GEO, HIS, POL, PSY, SOC, SSC

Culturally Diverse Humanities Electives

Credits
ASL-Any American Sign Language Course3
FRE-Any French Course
HUM 240Comparative Religion3
HUM 260The Art Of Being Human I3
SPA-any Spanish course3

Culturally Diverse Literature Electives

Credits
ENG 235Children's Literature3
ENG 236Modern Drama3
ENG 237Special Topics: Queer American Drama3
ENG 261The Short Story3
ENG 265Great Writers of Harlem3

Campus/format

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Transfer options

For transfer options, please click here. It is recommended that you also consult with your academic advisor.

Career options

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Courses

CHE 107. General Chemistry I. 4 Credits.

This course provides the student with an understanding of the fundamental principles of matter and energy. The course includes atomic and molecular structure, the periodic table, patterns of chemical reactivity, solution chemistry, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, and chemical bonding. A mathematical approach to chemical problems is used to develop problem solving skills as well as a conceptual understanding. Laboratory work is correlated with class discussion. Lab sessions will be hands-on experiences revolving around and applying the topics listed in the lab section of the syllabus. Prerequisites: ENG 098, FYE 101, MAT 096 or higher (or corequisite), RDG 098, or placement. Recommended: High school chemistry or other previous chemistry classes.

CHE 108. General Chemistry II. 4 Credits.

A continuation of CHE 107 General Chemistry I, this course covers such topics as intermolecular forces, behavior of gases, liquids and solutions, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, oxidation-reduction and electro-chemistry. A mathematical approach to chemical problems is used to develop problem solving skills as well as a conceptual understanding. Laboratory work is correlated with class discussion. Lab sessions will be hands-on experiences revolving around and applying the topics listed in the lab section of the syllabus. Prerequisite: CHE 107. Spring and summer.

CHE 120. Environmental Chemistry. 4 Credits.

This course is an introduction to the principles of chemistry with an emphasis on the environmental chemistry of air, energy, water and soil. It is recommended as a general science elective or as a foundation for continued study in the sciences, particularly natural resources. The following basic chemical topics will be introduced: matter classification, atomic structure, periodic table, chemical bonds, chemical formulas and names, spectroscopy, solutions, concentration, pH, moles and the use of energy. The course emphasizes an understanding of current environmental problems, such as air and water pollution, the ozone layer and energy issues. The relationships between science, technology and society are also discussed in the context of environmental issues. Lab sessions will be hands-on experiences revolving around and applying the topics listed in the lab section of the syllabus. Prerequisites: ENG 098, FYE 101, MAT 092, RDG 098, or placement. Offered occasionally.

CHE 180. Instrumental Analysis. 4 Credits.

This course will provide a background on the fundamentals of using instrumentation to measure chemical properties and concentration including sample preparation, calibration, and data analysis. The lab portion will provide hands-on experience with instrumentation used in a variety of different analytical instruments and will include experience with electrochemical analytical techniques, gas chromatography, advanced UV-VIS spectrophotometry, and High Performance Liquid Chromatography. Some physical testing may also be included. Lab sessions will be hands-on experiences revolving around and applying the topics listed in the lab section of the syllabus. Prerequisite: MAT 092 or placement; CHE 203, CHE 120 or CHE 107.

CHE 203. Introduction To Inorganic, Organic, And Biochemistry. 4 Credits.

This class is an introduction to the fundamentals of inorganic and organic chemistry as a foundation for biotechnology, health sciences or further study in the sciences. This survey course will introduce principles of measurement, classification of matter, energy, atomic structure and the periodic table, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, moles, solutions, acids and bases, basic organic chemistry, the four classes of biochemical and some metabolic pathways. Lab sessions will be hands-on experiences revolving around and applying the topics listed in the lab section of the syllabus. Prerequisites: ENG 098, FYE 101, MAT 092, RDG 098, or placement.

CHE 207. Organic Chemistry I. 4 Credits.

Organic chemistry is the study of carbon and its compounds. In the first semester, the structures and properties of the basic hydrocarbons and their simple substitution products will be studied. This will allow us to explore the following fundamental topics in organic chemistry: isomers, nomenclature, basic reaction mechanisms, spectroscopy (IR, NMR and MS). The functional groups will be introduced. Laboratory work will develop basic skills and techniques, and be correlated with class discussion. Lab sessions will be hands on experiences revolving around and applying the topics listed in the lab section of the syllabus. Prerequisites: CHE 108 with a grade of C or higher, ENG 102; MAT 126, MAT 143 or MAT 162. Fall.

CHE 208. Organic Chemistry II. 4 Credits.

Organic chemistry is the study of carbon and its compounds. In the second semester, the structures and properties of the substituted hydrocarbons (functional groups) will be studied. This will include their synthesis and their reactions. The use of spectroscopy (IR, NMR and MS) will be further developed. Multistep synthesis of complex organic compounds will be introduced. Laboratory work will develop more advanced skills and techniques, and be correlated with class discussion. Lab sessions will be hands on experiences revolving around and applying the topics listed in the lab section of the syllabus. Prerequisites: CHE 207 with a grade of C or higher. Spring.