Art

The Art Department offers an Associate Degree in Art and an Art Concentration in the Liberal Arts and Sciences program.  Both programs provide students with the opportunity to transfer to a four year college or university and both contain the MassTransfer block.  The Associate Degree in Art is geared for students who want to gain employment in art or transfer to a private four year institution.    The Art Concentration in the Liberal Arts Degree contains the MassTransfer block and is geared for students who want to transfer to a Massachusetts public instition.   The art faculty, all of whom are working professional artists, actively assist students with developing transfer portfolios, college applications and scholarships, and teach basic digital tools required for success. Small classes lead to a close-knit, active and inspired community.

Please click here for MassTransfer information

Art (ART)

This degree prepares students for transfer to bachelor degree programs such as fine art, design, art education, illustration, animation, fashion design, art therapy, art history, museum studies, art conservation, architecture, and landscape design. Students learn the fundamental principles of art and design while exploring a broad range of media in drawing, painting, sculpture, and ceramics and learn basic digital tools required for success. Art related volunteer and service learning opportunities are offered. Students participate in an annual art exhibition. This program includes the general education requirements for transfer to most four-year colleges and universities. Designated courses can be substituted to meet the Mass Transfer agreement.

Courses are taught in small groups. Art Professors are committed to individual student success and assist with portfolio development and transfer applications.

Year 1
FallCredits
ART 263Drawing I 3
ART 251Two-Dimensional Design 3
ART 252Three-Dimensional Design 3
ART 259Ceramics I-Hand-Building 3
ENG 101College Writing I 3
Spring
ART 264Drawing II 3
ART 253Painting I 3
ART 109Art History I 3
ENG 102College Writing II 3
MAT 126Topics In Mathematics(or higher **) 4
Year 2
Fall
ART 269Drawing III 3
ART 271Sculpture I 3
ART 110Art History II 3
Science Elective 1 3-4
Art Elective (see list below) or Lab Science Elective** 2 3-4
Spring
ART 211Portfolio and Digital Tools - Capstone Course 3
Art Elective (see list below) or Non-behavioral Social Science** 3 3
Art elective (see list below) or Social Science elective** 3, 4 3
Behavioral Social Science Elective 4 3
Health Elective (see list below) 5 2-3
 Total Credits: 60-63
1

Science Electives (may choose a 3 or 4 credit course): AQS, BIO, BTC, CHE, EAS, EGM, NRD or PHY

2

Lab Science Electives (must be a 4 credit course): AQS, BIO, BTC, CHE, EAS, EGM, NRD or PHY

3

 Non-Behavioral Social Science Electives: ECO, GEO, HIS, POL or SSC

4

Behavioral Social Science Electives: ANT, PSY, SOC or SSC

5

PER 130 Health, Fitness, And Wellness is recommended for transfer

**

Substitute these courses to complete the Mass Transfer Block agreement.

Art Electives

Credits
ART 241Watercolor Painting3
ART 242Advanced Watercolors3
ART 254Painting II3
ART 257Painting III3
ART 260Ceramics II - Potter's Wheel3
ART 284Ceramics III3
ART 272Sculpture II3
ART 273Sculpture III3
ART 286Printmaking I3
ART 287Printmaking II3

See the art general information for program competencies and technical standards.

Health Elective

Credits
BIO 101Introduction To Nutrition (formerly NUT101)3
BIO 103Human Health And Disease3
BIO 112Biology Of Cancer3
BIO 230Nutrition, Health, And Sustainability3
CHC 101Complementary Health Care3
CHC 102Foundations of Yoga3
CHC 108Transforming Stress3
CHC 220Mind-Body-Spirit Connection3
EXS 102Principles Of Anatomy And Kinesiology3
EXS 201Exercise Science And Nutrition4
PER 126Fitness And Wellness2
PER 127Weight Management through Walking and Resistance Training2
PER 130Health, Fitness, And Wellness3

See Art program competencies and technical standards.

Campus

Gardner Only

Transfer options

For transfer options, please click here. It is recommended that you also consult with your academic advisor.

Special requirements

Technical standards must be met with or without accommodations.

Career options/Earning potential

For career options, please click here.

Art Concentration (LART) (New)

A Degree in Liberal Arts and Sciences

This program provides a broad foundation in academic studies with an emphasis in art and design. This degree includes important fundamental courses recognized by transfer institutions and industries that value creative thinking and innovation. Students transfer to four year programs where an art background is necessary but not the sole focus such as: art therapy, art history, museum studies, art conservation, art administration, non-profit management, or education. This program meets the requirements for the MassTransfer agreement.

Year 1
FallCredits
ART 263Drawing I 3
ART 252Three-Dimensional Design 3
ART 251Two-Dimensional Design 3
ENG 101College Writing I 3
MAT 143 or 163Statistics or Precalculus (or higher) 4
Spring
ART 264Drawing II 3
ART 259Ceramics I-Hand-Building 3
ART 109Art History I 3
ENG 102College Writing II 3
Lab Science Elective (see list below) 3 4
Year 2
Fall
ART 110Art History II 3
Social Science Elective 1,2 3
SPC 113Speech (formerly THE113) 3
Behavioral Social Science Elective 1 3
Lab Science Elective 3 4
Spring
ART 253Painting I 3
ENG 290LAS Capstone: Advanced Writing and Research 3
Literature Elective (see list below)  3
Non-behavioral Social Science Elective 2 3
Health elective (see list below) 4 2-3
 Total Credits: 62-63
1

Behavioral Social Science Electives: ANT, PSY, SOC, SSC

2

Non-Behavioral Social Science Electives: ECO, GEO, HIS, POL, SSC

3

Lab Science Electives (must choose a 4 credit course): AQS, BIO, BTC, CHE, EAS, EGM, NRD, PHY

4

Per 130 is recommended for transfer

Literature Electives

Credits
ENG 201Honors English: American Romanticism3
ENG 203Twentieth Century American Authors3
ENG 205Shakespeare3
ENG 210Literature Of The Sixties3
ENG 213American Literature I3
ENG 214American Literature II3
ENG 221Women's Literature3
ENG 224Mystery Fiction3
ENG 227English Literature I3
ENG 228English Literature II3
ENG 233Science Fiction3
ENG 235Children's Literature3
ENG 236Modern Drama3
ENG 237Special Topics: Queer American Drama3
ENG 252Shakespeare and Star Wars: A Study of Tragedy through Drama and Film3
ENG 259Literary Masterpieces I3
ENG 260Literary Masterpieces II3
ENG 261The Short Story3

Health Electives

Credits
BIO 101Introduction To Nutrition (formerly NUT101)3
BIO 103Human Health And Disease3
BIO 112Biology Of Cancer3
BIO 230Nutrition, Health, And Sustainability3
CHC 101Complementary Health Care3
CHC 102Foundations of Yoga3
CHC 108Transforming Stress3
CHC 220Mind-Body-Spirit Connection3
EXS 102Principles Of Anatomy And Kinesiology3
EXS 201Exercise Science And Nutrition4
PER 126Fitness And Wellness2
PER 127Weight Management through Walking and Resistance Training2
PER 130Health, Fitness, And Wellness3

See Art program competencies and technical standards.

Campus

Gardner Only

Transfer options

For transfer options, please click here. It is recommended that you also consult with your academic advisor.

MassTransfer

Students who plan to transfer to a Massachusetts state university or a University of Massachusetts campus may be eligible to transfer under the MassTransfer agreement which provides transfer advantages to those who qualify.

Please click here for MassTransfer information

Special requirements

Technical standards must be met with or without accommodations.

Career options/Earning potential

For career options, please click here.

Program Competencies for ART and LART

Upon graduation from this program, students shall have demonstrated:

  • The skills and knowledge necessary to transfer to an art program at a four-year college or university.
  • An understanding of the creative process.
  • A working knowledge of the language of visual design (i.e., basic design theory, design elements, composition, etc.).
  • An understanding of the properties of various media (i.e., clay, oils, watercolor, inks, charcoal, etc.).
  • An awareness and understanding of the sources, history and development of art.
  • An understanding of the aesthetic and technical aspects of the studio arts.
  • The ability to develop a professional portfolio for transferring to a four-year institution, as well as individual portfolios for each art course.
  • The ability to analyze career/transfer opportunities and assess their own skills and abilities in relation to their future.
  • The ability to think critically regarding all aspects of the creative process.

Capstone Course for LART

ENG 290 LAS Capstone: Advanced Writing and Research is the required capstone course for all Liberal Arts & Sciences majors and is to be taken after successfully completing ENG 102 College Writing II and 45 credits.

Technical Standards1 for ART and LART

1

For general information about technical standards and accommodation, see Technical Standards.

Students entering these programs must be able to demonstrate the ability to:

  • Comprehend textbook material at the 11th grade level.
  • Communicate and assimilate information either in spoken, printed, signed, or computer voice format.
  • Gather, analyze, and draw conclusions from data.
  • Stand, stoop and walk for a minimum of four hours.
  • Walk for a minimum of six hours, not necessarily consecutively.
  • Lift 25 pounds to waist high, shoulder high, and above the head.
  • Comprehend the spoken word.
  • Function cooperatively in a studio learning environment where limited space, equipment, and tools are shared.
  • Students with disabilities should contact the Art Department for accommodations.

Courses

ART 101. Introduction To Painting. 3 Credits.

This studio course familiarizes the non-art major with the art of painting in oils and/or acrylics. Students learn basic fundamentals of color mixing and applying paint while painting from still life set-ups, portrait models and other typical subject matter. Discussions and reproductions introduce students to relevant painters and their work and a general appreciation of the craft of painting. Some art materials must be purchased for this course. Not open to art majors. Prerequisite: None.

ART 103. Introduction To Sculpture. 3 Credits.

This studio course introduces principles of sculpture and three-dimensional design to the student with little or no previous art experience. The emphasis will be on learning to skillfully manipulate different materials and to develop an understanding of art concepts as they apply to the practice, viewing, and discussion of art. The student will gain an appreciation for three-dimensional work as he/she directly experiences the process inherent in creating art. A range of media will be used. Not open to art majors. Prerequisite: None.

ART 105. Introduction To Drawing. 3 Credits.

This course is designed as an introductory-level course for those with little or no previous experience in drawing. Its aim is to expose the student to a range of media and working approaches to the various problems of drawing. The task of learning to see will be met as a combination of close observation and spontaneous response to the media of drawing. In class, as well as out of class, drawings will be initiated by the students themselves. Subjects will include landscape, still life, interiors, portrait, and the clothed human figure. Prerequisite: None.

ART 109. Art History I. 3 Credits.

This course is a chronological survey of the visual arts of the Western World from prehistoric times to the Renaissance. The course presents significant sculpture, architecture, and paintings of this period through slides, films, textual reproductions, and actual museum pieces. Lectures include critical, visual, and technical analysis of these works, biographical sketches of contributing artists, and relevant cultural and historical details that influenced the art of these centuries. Works of art from non-Western cultures will also be studied. Prerequisites: ENG 098, FYE 101, RDG 098, (or placement). Spring.

ART 110. Art History II. 3 Credits.

This course is a chronological survey of the visual arts of the Western World from C.E. 1300 to 1950. The course presents significant sculpture, paintings, and architecture of these years through slides and textual reproductions. Lectures include critical, visual, and technical analysis of these works, biographical sketches of the contributing artists, and the relevant cultural and historical events and personages that influenced and were influenced by the art of these centuries. Chapters on Islamic, Asian, African, North & South American Art focus on issues of cultural diversity.Prerequisites: ENG 098, FYE 101, RDG 098, (or placement). Fall.

ART 113. Introduction To Studio. 3 Credits.

This studio course introduces the fine arts to the student with no previous art experience and is geared toward progressive development of skills in handling materials and understanding art concepts as they apply to the practice, viewing, and discussion of art. The student will gain an appreciation for the visual arts by directly experiencing the process inherent in creating art. A variety of media will be used; and concepts relevant to design, drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, or ceramics will be presented. Not open to art majors. Prerequisite: None.

ART 211. Portfolio and Digital Tools - Capstone Course. 3 Credits.

This capstone course provides the student with practical skills and knowledge essential in preparing for future education or a career in the visual arts, articulating their identity and place in the arts. Students will critique and assess accomplishments to improve and develop a comprehensive portfolio of work. Students will focus on developing individual portfolios, researching and preparing application materials for bachelor degree programs, creating an artist's statement and resume, and advancing written and oral communications skills. Students are introduced to digital tools necessary for success. Documenting work, use of a digital camera, introduction to Photoshop, and creating promotional materials will be presented. Required course for ART majors. Open to LART majors. Spring. Prerequisites: ART 263, ART 264, ART 269, or permission of division dean. Spring.

ART 241. Watercolor Painting. 3 Credits.

This course explores the basic techniques of working in the medium of watercolors. Exercises using transparencies and opaque techniques will be assigned. Slides of historical works by masters of the medium will be screened and discussed. Prerequisites: ART 105, ART 113, and ART 263 are recommended.

ART 242. Advanced Watercolors. 3 Credits.

This course is a continuation of ART 241 Watercolor Painting with an emphasis on experimenting with the medium of watercolor and working in mixed media. Slides, museum visits, matting, and exhibiting works are incorporated into the course. Prerequisite: ART 241.

ART 251. Two-Dimensional Design. 3 Credits.

Two-Dimensional Design presents the principles of expressive design on flat surfaces through directed activities in painting, drawing, collage, and digital imaging. Students practice the use of line, shape, color, value, and other design fundamentals. Lecture, critique, and discussion further engage students in the exploration of artwork from several cultures in discovering what constitutes good design. Students will need to buy most of the course materials. Prerequisites: ENG 098, FYE 101, RDG 098, (or placement); ART 263 is recommended.

ART 252. Three-Dimensional Design. 3 Credits.

This course provides students with the processes to create three-dimensional shapes. The first part of the course is a study of geometric and organic forms. By using materials such as cardboard, styrofoam, plaster, and clay, forms are constructed that explore the relationship of parts to the whole in their spatial context as the basis of good design. Additional problems stress the tectonic aspects of design and how they are used to create sculptural forms. An assigned portrait study in clay, along with procedures for plaster molding and casting, will be completed by the end of the course. Artists and approaches will be introduced from western and non-western perspectives. Prerequisites: ENG 098, FYE 101, RDG 098, (or placement). Fall.

ART 253. Painting I. 3 Credits.

Painting I offers basic instruction in oil painting and is intended for art majors and other students with an art background. Class and home assignments allow the student to practice mixing colors and manipulating paint. Accurate translation of observed color, form, and space is emphasized. Personal expression is encouraged. Students also learn about brush selection, surface preparation, pigment composition, and the use of various mediums. Lectures, discussions and critiques familiarize students with the history of painting from various cultures and what constitutes good painting. Students are responsible for supplying most of the materials needed for the course and creating a website portfolio. Prerequisites: ART 263 or permission of division dean. Spring.

ART 254. Painting II. 3 Credits.

Painting II is a continuation of ART 253 Painting I. Students paint from the human figure, interior spaces, and the surrounding landscape in an effort to 1. better understand the relationship of light, color, form, and space; 2. improve their ability to translate a three-dimensional experience onto a flat surface; and 3. expand their transfer portfolios. Outside of class, this course encourages the development of more personal motifs in order to further explore painting as an expressive medium. Discussions and lectures acquaint the students with the paintings and artists of varying cultures and times. Students must participate in an exhibit of work at semester's end. Students are responsible for supplying most of the materials needed for this course. Prerequisite: ART 253 or permission of division dean. Fall.

ART 257. Painting III. 3 Credits.

Painting III is for advanced students interested in pursuing their personal interests in oil painting. Emphasis is on the individual work of the student, thematic development, and aesthetic considerations unique to the painting process. Painting III is recommended for the student who is motivated, directed, and able to work independently. A small exhibition of work in the school Gallery is required. Prerequisites: ART 254 and permission of the division dean.

ART 258. Painting IV. 3 Credits.

Painting IV is for advanced students who have completed Painting III and are interested in continuing their pursuit of personal motifs in oil painting. Emphasis is on the individual work of the student, thematic development, and aesthetic considerations unique to the painting process. A small exhibition of work in the East Wing Gallery is required. Prerequisites: ART 257 or permission of the division dean.

ART 259. Ceramics I-Hand-Building. 3 Credits.

Students create functional and sculptural work in clay as they develop skills in hand-building methods (pinch, coil, drape, and slab) and end with an introduction to the potter’s wheel. Work from Africa, Indigenous Americas, historical and contemporary ceramists, along with ancient firing practices will be presented. The course may include different clay bodies and glazes, firing the work in outdoor kilns and the electric or gas kilns. Individual expression will be encouraged as the student gains an appreciation for the history of ceramics and clay as a unique medium. Outside reading assignments and keeping a sketchbook throughout the semester will be required. Prerequisites: ENG 098, FYE 101, RDG 098, (or placement).

ART 260. Ceramics II - Potter's Wheel. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on developing skills on the potter’s wheel to create functional forms (cylinders, bowls, jars, mugs, etc.) and hand-building sculptural clay pieces of a large scale. Ceramic work from the Far East, the Mediterranean, Europe and work by historical and contemporary ceramists will be presented. Individual expression will be encouraged as students visualize and build pieces that challenge their skills. Different clay bodies, glazes, glaze applications, and decorative techniques will be explored. The course may include firing in outdoor trash barrel kilns, a raku firing, or using the electric and gas kilns. Outside reading assignments and keeping a sketchbook throughout the semester will be required. Prerequisite: ART 259 or permission of division dean. Spring.

ART 263. Drawing I. 3 Credits.

Students will explore a wide range of media and working processes common to the art of drawing as well as the historical context on which contemporary views of drawing are based. Assignments will center on the ability to translate objects in actual three-dimensional space onto a flat two-dimensional surface. Learning to see will be a primary focus of class work. All aspects of style and technique will be discussed or demonstrated. A certain portion of the semester's work will be devoted to drawing from the human figure. May include clothed and nude models. Artists and approaches will be introduced from western and non-western perspectives. Prerequisites: ENG 098, FYE 101, RDG 098, (or placement).

ART 264. Drawing II. 3 Credits.

This course is aimed at developing the artistic areas that were begun in ART 263 Drawing I so that students can achieve an overall confidence level with a range of different media and approaches. Areas of concentration will focus on composition, perspective, and illusionary, as well as two-dimensional aspects of space. Artists and approaches will be introduced from western and non-western perspectives. A significant amount of time will be spent developing drawings from the human figure from nude and clothed models. Portfolio development in this area will be encouraged with critiques aimed at enhancement of individual drawing strengths. Assigned problems beyond class time will focus on individually initiated work aimed at a clearer definition of the student's own goals in drawing. Prerequisite: ART 263 or permission of division dean. Spring.

ART 269. Drawing III. 3 Credits.

This course is designed for the art student to develop advanced level drawings and to create work for a portfolio. The student should be capable of individually directed work in drawing and have completed all other drawing courses. Emphasis is on thematic development, the individual work of the student, and aesthetic considerations unique to the drawing process. Clothed and nude models may be used. Prerequisite: ART 264. Fall.

ART 270. Drawing IV. 3 Credits.

This course is for the advanced student who is in pursuit of creating work for a portfolio, after completing all other course offerings in drawing. Emphasis is on the individual work of the student, thematic development, and aesthetic considerations unique to the drawing process. Recommended for the student who is motivated, directed, and able to work independently. Prerequisites: ART 269, and permission of the division dean.

ART 271. Sculpture I. 3 Credits.

The aim of this course is to teach sculptural working principles that hold true of good sculpture, whether from earlier traditions or more modern ones. The course is structured with assigned problems that will engage the student in aspects of the traditional figure study in clay using nude models, and assignments aimed at exploring the (object) aspect of form and the varying spatial aspects that form its context. Subtractive techniques will be introduced. A wide variety of sculptural examples from western and non-western cultures in prehistory or modern era will act as a source of sculptural precedent for individual initiatives in problem solving. The tectonic or building aspects of construction involving weight, mass, and durability will be put on par with the intellectual aspect of the creative process. Success in the course will depend on both. Prerequisites: ART 252 or permission of the division dean. Fall.

ART 272. Sculpture II. 3 Credits.

This course is structured so that students who have begun to develop skills in the sculptural building processes can practice and further refine these skills at the higher level with increased creative problem solving. More attention will be paid to work from the model. Problems will be given to expand the student's familiarity with a broader range of material and ideas. An option to learn subtractive techniques in wood and stone will be made available. Students will learn lost wax bronze casting procedures. Prerequisite: ART 271 or permission of the division dean. Spring.

ART 273. Sculpture III. 3 Credits.

This course is for the advanced student who is in pursuit of creating work for a portfolio, after completing all other course offerings in sculpture. Emphasis is on the individual work of the student, thematic development, and aesthetic considerations unique to the sculpture process. Recommended for the student who is motivated, directed, and able to work independently. Prerequisites: ART 272, and permission of the division dean.

ART 274. Sculpture IV. 3 Credits.

This course is for advanced students who are in pursuit of creating work for a portfolio, after completing all other course offerings in sculpture. Emphasis is on the individual work of the student, thematic development, and aesthetic considerations unique to the sculpture process. This course is recommended for the student who is motivated, directed, and able to work independently. Prerequisites: ART 273 and permission of the division dean.

ART 284. Ceramics III. 3 Credits.

This course is for the advanced student who is in pursuit of creating work for a portfolio, after completing all other course offerings in ceramics. The student is expected to create a thematic body of ceramic work and further develop their technical skills and conceptual abilities. Further exploration of clay bodies, glazes, kiln firings, and aesthetic considerations unique to the ceramic process will be presented. The student should have some previous knowledge of working with clay, understand methods of hand building, and have basic skills using the potter's wheel. The student is expected to be self-motivated, able to work independently, and to have specific goals. In addition to creating the body of work in individual proposal that is developed with the instructor, the student will complete an assignment on glaze chemistry, and give an oral presentation on his/her research of a significant potter, ceramist, or sculptor. Prerequisites: ART 260 and permission of the division dean.

ART 285. Ceramics IV. 3 Credits.

This course is a continuation of ART 284 Ceramics III and is designed for the art student interested in further advancing skills for working with clay and creating advanced level work for a professional or transfer portfolio. The student should be capable of individually directed work and have completed all other ceramic courses. Further exploration of clay bodies, glazes, glaze chemistry, kiln firings, and aesthetic considerations unique to the ceramic process will be presented. The course will include research, oral presentations, a glaze chemistry project relevant to the student's own work and critiques. Emphasis will be on the individual work of the student. Prerequisites: ART 284 and permission of the division dean.

ART 286. Printmaking I. 3 Credits.

An introduction to printmaking that may include monotypes, relief, and intaglio. Thematic development and individual expression will be encouraged as the student develops a portfolio of monotypes, drypoints, etchings, and linocuts. The student will learn the process of plate preparation, applying a ground to the plate; the proper use of the press and the matting and care of prints will be presented. Safer approaches to printmaking will be covered. Prerequisite: ART 105, ART 113, or ART 263 or permission of division dean.

ART 287. Printmaking II. 3 Credits.

The student will focus on intaglio printmaking and the use of color or multiple blocks in relief printmaking. Different grounds, aquatint, etching a plate, registration, and the printing of a consistent edition of prints will be presented. Individual expression and aesthetic considerations will be encouraged in the development and printing of the student's original image. Traditional and contemporary innovations in printmaking will be emphasized. Prerequisite: ART 286 or permission of division dean.

ART 291. Printmaking III. 3 Credits.

This course is for the advanced student who is in pursuit of creating work for a portfolio, after completing all other course offerings in printmaking. Emphasis is on the individual work of the student, thematic development, and aesthetic considerations unique to the printmaking process. Recommended for the student who is motivated, directed, and able to work independently. Prerequisites: ART 287, and permission of the division dean.