Health Care (HCC)

HCC 111. Emergency Medical Technician I (Evening Only). 4 Credits.

This is the basic course for Emergency Medical Technician/Ambulance that follows the guidelines outlined by the United States Department of Health Education and Welfare in conjunction with the National Traffic Safety Administration, Department of Transportation. This is a lecture, discussion, demonstration, and practical application of the knowledge and skill necessary to care for individuals who have life-threatening emergencies and injuries. This is the first half of the requirement for certification. Prerequisites: ENG 098, FYE 101, RDG 098, or placement. Evening only.

HCC 112. Emergency Medical Technician II (Evening Only). 4 Credits.

This is a continuation of EMT Emergency Medical Technician I, dealing with the care of individuals who have common medical emergencies, childbirth, problems of children as patients, lifting and moving patients, environmental emergencies, and extrication from automobiles. This course is the second half of the requirement for certification. Prerequisite: HCC 111 with a C grade or higher. Evening only.

HCC 201. Paramedicine I. 3 Credits.

This course is the first course designed for Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT) with at least one year as an EMT Basic or Advanced to obtain certification/licensure as a paramedic. Course concepts which will be taught to the National EMS Education Standards for paramedics will include: the history of EMS systems and development, workforce safety and wellness, EMS/EMD communications, life span development, medical/legal, documentation, therapeutic communications and public health. After completion of this course, the student will understand the origins and present-day structure of emergency medical care delivery systems. The paramedic’s roles and responsibilities and his or her relationship to the emergency medical services (EMS) system are explained, as well as the paramedic’s role in the quality-improvement process. Other EMS provider levels are described. The foundations necessary for being a competent, effective, caring, and ethical paramedic are presented. The interrelationships of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s components of the EMS system are outlined, as well as the paramedic’s impact on research, data collection, and evidence-based decision making. The paramedic’s responsibilities as a student and a practitioner are also studied. Adherence to the attendance policy and completion of this course with a final grade of B- or better must be achieved in order to advance in the PAC program. Prerequisites: ENG 098, RDG 098 and FYE 101 or placement; HCC 111, HCC 112 or current State or National EMT Certification from another Accredited EMT Training Program and 1 year of experience/or 75 patient contacts; BIO 152, HCC 202, HCC 203 (corequisites). Fall.

HCC 202. Paramedicine II. 4 Credits.

This course is designed to be taught to the National EMS Education Standards for paramedics. Upon completion of this course, the student through didactic, critical thinking group assignments and laboratory skills demonstration and simulations will be able to describe and integrate scene and patient assessment findings with epidemiology and pathophysiology to form a field impression, to use clinical reasoning to develop a list of differential diagnosis and modify the assessment to formulate a treatment plan. These sections will include scene size up, primary survey, history taking, secondary assessment, use of monitoring and diagnostic devices, reassessment and integration to assessment findings to medicine. They will understand the significance and characteristics of respiratory emergencies in infant, child, and adult populations. Students should be able to demonstrate a fundamental comprehension of the following topics: respiratory anatomy and physiology, pathophysiology, signs and symptoms of various respiratory etiologies (eg, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pneumonia), and the assessment and management necessary to provide basic and advanced care in the prehospital setting. Students will then learn airway management, respiration, and artificial ventilation which integrates complex knowledge of anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology into the assessment to develop and implement a treatment plan with the goal of ensuring a patent airway, adequate mechanical ventilation, and respiration for patients of all ages. Adherence to the attendance policy and completion of this course with a final grade of B- or better must be achieved in order to advance in the PAC program. Prerequisites: ENG 098, RDG 098, FYE 101 or placement; HCC 111, HCC 112; BIO 152, HCC 201, HCC 203 (corequisites). Fall.

HCC 203. Paramedicine III. 3 Credits.

This course will be taught to the National EMS Education Standards for Paramedics. After completion of the course the student will have an understanding of pathophysiology as it pertains to cellular changes in response to stressors. The understanding of what happens when the cellular system can no longer maintain homeostasis is a key component of patient evaluation and treatment. Medication administration includes fluids and electrolytes—balanced and imbalanced—and the processes of osmosis and diffusion, discusses the various types of IV solutions used in the prehospital setting and the techniques of IV therapy and intraosseous infusion. Describes the mathematical principles used in pharmacology and for calculating medication doses (bolus and maintenance infusion). Paramedics administer medication in different forms and a discussion of these routes for administering medications. Childbirth and pregnancy are normally occuring states, but they are not without potential complications, including maternal death and fetal death. With the advent of modern medicine, maternal and infant mortality rates have been significantly reduced, and close medical monitoring usually discovers problems well before childbirth. Finally students should be able to recognize behaviors that are associated with risk to providers, the patient, or others. They should be able to discuss medical/legal concerns of the treatment and transport of the patient having a psychiatric emergency. Students should be able to identify situations when restraints may be justified and whether chemical or physical restraint is the preferred method. Discuss potential causes of behavioral emergencies and medications that may be used in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Describe the assessment process and safe management of the patient having a psychiatric emergency. The attendance policy must be followed and completion of this course with a final grade of B- or better must be achieved in order to advance in the PAC program. Prerequisites: ENG 098, RDG 098 and FYE 101 or placement; HCC 111, HCC 112; BIO 152, HCC 201, HCC 202 (corequisites). Fall.

HCC 211. Paramedicine IV. 3 Credits.

This course taught to the National Educational Standards for Paramedics integrates comprehensive knowledge of pharmacology and shock and resuscitation to formulate a treatment plan intended to mitigate emergencies and improve the overall health of the patient. Medication administration is a defining element of paramedic clinical practice. Paramedics use the science of pharmacology in a variety of ways, course content includes medication safety, medication legislation, naming, classifications, schedules, pharmacokinetics, storage and security, autonomic pharmacology, metabolism and excretion, mechanism of action, phases of medication activity, medication response relationships, medication interactions and toxicity. The student will also be able to integrate comprehensive knowledge of causes and pathophysiology into the management of cardiac arrest and prearrest states and apply comprehensive knowledge of the causes and pathophysiology of shock, respiratory failure, or arrest into the management of these conditions, with an emphasis on early intervention to prevent arrest. Adherence to the attendance policy and completion of this course with a final grade of B- or better must be achieved in order to advance in the PAC program. Prerequisites: BIO 152, HCC 201, HCC 202, HCC 203 with a B- or higher; HCC 212, HCC 213, HCC 214 (corequisites). Spring.

HCC 212. Cardiology. 4 Credits.

Course concepts which will be taught to the National EMS Education Standards for Paramedics. Upon course completion the students will be able to describe the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system as well as discuss epidemiological and pathophysiological conditions that impact this system. Students will be able to apply various patient presentations, integrate assessment findings, formulate a field impression, and implement a comprehensive treatment plan for management of these conditions involving the cardiovascular system. They will be able to recognize signs and symptoms of common cardiovascular conditions and disorders, demonstrate relevant assessment techniques for cardiac function, perform diagnostic testing of cardiac status, and manage patients using techniques and skills for cardiovascular emergencies. Students will be able to discuss pathophysiology, risk factors, and common medications that may be seen in the cardiovascular emergency patient. They will be able to safely perform interventions and treatments for patients having a cardiovascular emergency. Students must sucessfully complete the American Heart Association Advanced Cardiac Life Support Course at the end of this program in order to go to Clinical 2. Prerequisites: BIO 152, HCC 201, HCC 202, HCC 203 with a B- or higher; HCC 211, HCC 213, HCC 214 (corequisites). Spring.

HCC 213. Medical Emergencies. 3 Credits.

The course concepts will be taught to the National EMS Education Standards for Paramedics. Upon course completion the students will be able to discuss epidemiological and pathophysiological conditions that impact these systems. Students will be able to apply various patient presentations, integrate assessment findings, formulate a field impression, and implement a comprehensive treatment plan for management of medical emergencies related to the following systems: respiratory, neurological, endocrine, abdominal and gastrointestinal, diseases of the ears, eyes, nose and throat, genitourinary and renal systems, hematologic, immunologic, toxicology, infectious diseases, OB/GYN and psychiatric emergencies and environmental emergencies. Adherence to the attendance policy and completion of this course with a final grade of B- or better must be achieved in order to advance in the PAC program. Prerequisites: BIO 152, HCC 201, HCC 202, HCC 203 with a B- or higher; HCC 211, HCC 212, HCC 214 (corequisites). Spring.

HCC 214. Paramedicine Clinical I. 4 Credits.

Students will complete a minimum of 200 hours in a hospital/clinical setting. Student will participate in instruction within the clinical experience under the supervision of a preceptor. Clinical rotations will be completed in the following areas: psychiatric, labor and delivery and the OR anesthesia department. Students must document and complete all classroom work, clinical time and skills performed to the complete program requirements. Adherence to the attendance policy and completion of this course with a final grade of B- or better must be achieved in order to advance in the PAC program. Prerequisites: HCC 211, HCC 212, HCC 213 (corequisites). Spring.

HCC 216. Paramedicine Clinical II. 5 Credits.

Students will complete a minimum of 200 hours in a hospital/clinical setting. Student will integrate instruction within the clinical experience under the supervision of a preceptor. Clinical rotation will be conducted in a variety of medical-related facilities including emergency division intensive/critical care units, geriatric and pediatric units. Students must document all clinical time and complete program requirements. Adherence to the attendance policy and completion of this course with a final grade of B- or better must be achieved in order to advance in the PAC program. Prerequisites: HCC 214 with a B- or higher; HCC 217 (corequisite). Summer.

HCC 217. Trauma. 3 Credits.

This course will be taught to the National Standards for Paramedic Training and will prepare the student for clinical and field internships. Students will be able to integrate comprehensive knowledge of trauma systems, mechanisms of injury, the causes, pathophysiology and basic and advanced management of traumatic injuries to the following areas: Soft tissue trauma and bleeding, burns, face and neck trauma, head and spine trauma, chest trauma, abdominal and genitourinary system trauma, orthopedic and environmental trauma. Students must also successfully complete and pass the National Association of EMT's PreHospital Trauma Life Support Course. Prerequisites: HCC 211, HCC 212, HCC 213, HCC 214 with a B- or higher; HCC 216 and successful completion of PHTLS (corequisites). Summer.

HCC 220. Special Populations/EMS Operations. 5 Credits.

This course will be taught to the National Education Standards for Paramedics and upon course completion the students will be able to discuss epidemiological and pathophysiological conditions that impact these systems. Students will be able to apply various patient presentations, integrate assessment findings, formulate a field impression, and implement a comprehensive treatment plan for management of medical and traumatic emergencies related to the following special patient populations including obstetrics, neonatal care, pediatrics, geriatrics and patient with special challenges. Students will develop an understanding of the anatomy, physiology, psychological development differences within these age groups. Students will demonstrate a foundational understanding of the various issues that are associated with the aging process, including physiological, psychological, and social changes that accompany advanced age. In addition the student will learn and demonstrate an understanding about EMS Operations and career development. Advanced Medical Life Support, Pediatric Advanced Life Support, Emergency Pediatric Care and Neonatal Resuscitation Program certifications must also be successfully completed for course completion. Adherence to the attendance policy and completion of this course with a final grade of B- or better must be achieved in order to advance in the program. Prerequisites: HCC 216, HCC 217 with a B- or higher; HCC 221 (corequisite). Fall.

HCC 221. Paramedic Field Internship. 4 Credits.

Students will apply theory and acquired clinical skills while preforming pre-hospital treatment under the supervision of experienced, certified paramedics during 150 hours of field internship. Students will demonstrate satisfactory performance of all program requirements and be successfully signed off by the program medical director. Adherence to the attendance policy and completion of this course with a final grade of B- or better must be achieved in order to advance in the PAC program. Prerequisites: HCC 216 and HCC 217 with a B- or higher; HCC 220 (corequisite). Fall.